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In high-risk adolescents, cognitive-behavioural therapy reduced depression at 6 months more than assessment alone but did not differ from bibliotherapy or supportive-expressive therapy

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E Stice

Dr E Stice, Oregon Research Institute, Eugene, OR, USA; estice@ori.org

STUDY DESIGN

Design:

randomised controlled trial.

Allocation:

{unconcealed}*.†

Blinding:

blinded (outcome assessors).†

STUDY QUESTION

Setting:

6 high schools in the USA.

Patients:

341 students 14–19 years of age (mean age 16 y, 56% women) who scored ⩾20 on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies—Depression scale and did not meet criteria for major depression.

Intervention:

brief cognitive–behavioural group therapy (CBT, n = 89) or supportive-expressive group therapy (SET, n = 88), both given in 6 weekly 1-hour sessions; cognitive-behavioural bibliotherapy (CBB, n = 80); or assessment–only control (AC, n = 84).

Outcomes:

included symptoms and diagnosis of major depression, assessed using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children (16-item scale), social adjustment, assessed using the adapted Social Adjustment Scale Self-Report for Youth (17-item scale), and substance use (10–item scale).

Follow-up period:

6 months.

Patient follow-up:

93% at …

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