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Randomised controlled trial
In people with poorly controlled hypertension, self-management including telemonitoring is more effective than usual care for reducing systolic blood pressure at 6 and 12 months
  1. Kenneth Earle
  1. Thomas Addison Unit, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, St George's NHS Trust & St George's University of London, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Kenneth Earle
    Thomas Addison Unit and Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, St George's NHS Trust & St George's University of London, Blackshaw Road, Tooting, London SW17 0RE, UK; kearle{at}sgul.ac.uk

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Context

Hypertension is a major, modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but less than 25% of treated adult patients attain the target blood pressure of <140/90 mm Hg.1 The principal of patients-as-providers of their own care is an important objective for the National Health Service in the UK. Emerging evidence suggests that patient's involvement in decision making can lead to improved health outcomes, satisfaction and compliance. Remote monitoring systems (or telemonitoring) are considered as an appropriate tool for the self-management of long-term conditions, however; questions remain over its efficacy in the care of hypertensive patients.2

Methods

In this study, 527 patients aged between 35 and 85 years with a blood pressure of >140/90 and <200/100 mm Hg, prescribed ≤2 antihypertensive drugs and able to measure their own blood pressure were randomised to usual care or telemonitoring and self-care. …

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