Article Text

PDF
Systematic review and meta-analysis
Stopping smoking in the weeks prior to surgery has no effect on the risk of postoperative complications
  1. Carole Clair,
  2. Nancy A Rigotti
  1. Tobacco Research and Treatment Center, General Medicine Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  1. Correspondence to Nancy A Rigotti
    Tobacco Research and Treatment Center, General Medicine Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, 50 Staniford Street, 9th floor, Boston, MA 02114, USA; nrigotti{at}partners.org

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Commentary on: OpenUrlCrossRefPubMedWeb of Science

Context

Prior studies show mixed results regarding the harms and benefits of smoking cessation prior to surgery. In one study, cigarette smoking demonstrated an increased risk of peri- and postoperative complications compared with not smoking.1 A recent systematic review found that smoking cessation interventions 4–8 weeks before surgery not only promote tobacco abstinence but reduce postoperative surgical complications.2 Whether to advise a smoker to stop smoking in the immediate preoperative period is controversial because sparse data suggest that smoking cessation might increase postoperative pulmonary complications due to a temporary increase in sputum production and a decreased cough reflex.3 This systematic review examines whether quitting smoking within 8 weeks before surgery is associated with postoperative complications.

Methods

A systematic review with meta-analysis …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.