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Evid Based Med 18:114-115 doi:10.1136/eb-2012-100905
  • Prognosis
  • Cohort study

Exclusive bottle feeding of either formula or breast milk is associated with greater infant weight gain than exclusive breastfeeding, but findings may not reflect a causal effect of bottle feeding

  1. Michael S Kramer
  1. Department of Pediatrics and of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Dr Michael S Kramer
    Department of Pediatrics and of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, McGill University, 2300 Tupper Street, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3H 1P3; michael.kramer{at}mcgill.ca

Commentary on:

Context

The paper by Li et al addresses a topic that has been much studied and debated over the last several decades: the relationship between type of infant feeding and growth in the first year of life. This study adds a new twist, however: the consideration of bottle feeding, even among infants who receive breast milk via the bottle, rather than formula. Although formula and other nonhuman milk can be provided only by bottle, breast milk can be provided either via the breast or the bottle. Many breastfeeding mothers, particularly those who choose to or are obligated to return to work during …

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