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Randomised controlled trial
Self-management support has potential but is difficult to deliver in routine primary care
  1. Nicholas Zwar
  1. School of Public Health and Community Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  1. Correspondence to : Professor Nicholas Zwar, University of New South Wales, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia; n.zwar{at}unsw.edu.au

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The increasing prevalence of chronic conditions worldwide is putting huge pressure on health systems to look for effective ways of doing things differently. One appealing option from both the point of view of potential effectiveness and reduced cost is the idea of people with chronic conditions becoming active partners in the care of their own conditions. As demonstrated by the pioneering work of health educators such as Lorig et al,1 self-management (SM) support interventions that are delivered directly to the patient can be effective, but are often plagued by problems of limited reach or appeal only to those with greater motivation …

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