Article Text

PDF
Randomized controlled trial
Seven days of non-invasive cardiac monitoring early postischaemic stroke or TIA increases atrial fibrillation detection rate compared with current guideline-based practice
  1. Shelagh B Coutts1,
  2. Philip M C Choi2
  1. 1Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Radiology, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada;
  2. 2Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  1. Correspondence to: Dr Shelagh B Coutts, Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Radiology, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4; scoutts{at}ucalgary.ca

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Commentary on: OpenUrlAbstract/FREE Full Text

Context

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an established risk factor for stroke, and anticoagulation treatment is effective in reducing recurrent stroke risk. Guidelines recommend the use of clinical prediction tools to select patients with AF for anticoagulation therapy. It has long been recognised that paroxysmal AF (PAF) may pose a similar stroke risk to persistent AF, but the association between the duration of PAF and stroke risk remains uncertain. The best method to detect PAF has yet to be conclusively determined.1 ,2 This randomised controlled trial examines whether prolonged, non-invasive cardiac monitoring poststroke is superior to guideline-based standard treatment in PAF detection.

Methods

The trial assessed the detection of AF in …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.