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Systematic review
Personalised chronic care planning shows limited but promising effects on physical and psychological health and self-management capabilities
  1. Ellen I Schafheutle
  1. Centre for Pharmacy Workforce Studies (CPWS), Manchester Pharmacy School, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
  1. Correspondence to : Dr Ellen I Schafheutle, Centre for Pharmacy Workforce Studies (CPWS), Manchester Pharmacy School, The University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, UK; ellen.schafheutle{at}manchester.ac.uk

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Context

Self-management is increasingly recognised as critical to chronic illness care. The role that healthcare professionals have in proactively supporting self-management is also increasingly recogised, particularly when it comes to actively involving patients in decisions about their care. Personalised care planning is one intervention to achieve this, which the authors define as: “an anticipatory (forward looking), negotiated (series of) discussions between a patient and a healthcare professional.” A shared decision-making process follows which involves ‘goal setting’, where a patient and a clinician discuss treatment or management goals and ‘action planning’, where they agree a plan for tackling the goals essential features. This review assesses the specific effects of personalised care …

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