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Randomised controlled trial
A mandibular advancement device did not affect daytime sleepiness and quality of life in obstructive sleep apnoea
  1. Michiel H J Doff
  1. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
  1. Correspondence to : Dr Michiel H J Doff, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30.001, Groningen 9700 RB, The Netherlands; m.h.j.doff{at}umcg.nl

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Context

Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a sleep-related breathing disorder, characterised by (intense) snoring and recurrent obstructions of the upper airway during sleep. Among other things, OSA is associated with cardiovascular complications and increased mortality.1 Oral appliances that move the mandible into a more anterior position, commonly known as mandibular advancement devices (MAD), have gained popularity as an alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. It aims at relieving upper airway obstruction by positioning the mandible and its attached soft tissue structures in a forward and downward position during sleep. In this clinical trial, Marklund and colleagues …

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