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Randomised controlled trial
Current evidence does not support the widespread use of collaborative care for PTSD, but it is limited by not evaluating context
  1. Bradley V Watts
  1. VA National Center for Patient Safety 215 N. Main Street, White River Junction, Vermont, USA
  1. Correspondence to: VA National Center for Patient Safety 215 N. Main Street, White River Junction, Vermont, USA; Bradley.v.watts{at}dartmouth.edu

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Context

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common disorder that affects many patients in the primary care (PC) setting. There are multiple evidence-based treatments for PTSD, and some of which could easily be delivered in a PC setting. Collaborative care (CC) models have been used to improve depression care in PC. In comparison to depression, PTSD is less commonly treated in PC. There have been several attempts to examine CC models for PTSD; however, the results have been inconclusive. This study seeks to examine the effectiveness of CC for PTSD in Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs).

Methods

This study is a randomised, controlled, clinical trial comparing minimally enhanced usual care (MEU) with PTSD care management (PCM) in six FQHCs. The MEU …

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