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Randomised controlled trial
CPAP did not reduce cardiovascular events in patients with coronary or cerebrovascular disease and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea
  1. Yüksel Peker1,2,
  2. Patrick J Strollo Jr3,4
  1. 1Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey
  2. 2Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine/Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
  3. 3Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
  4. 4VA Pittsburgh Health System, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
  1. Correspondence to : Professor Yüksel Peker, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Marmara University, Pendik Education and Research Hospital, Sleep Medicine Center, Pendik, Istanbul 34668, Turkey; yuksel.peker{at}marmara.edu.tr

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Context

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major health problem globally. Many of the traditionally recognised risk factors contributing to adverse outcomes in these patients are managed in secondary prevention models. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), a common condition in such patients,1 has been largely neglected. The first-line treatment of OSA is nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, which reduces daytime sleepiness and improves quality of life.2 However, the majority of individuals with CVD and concomitant OSA do not report daytime sleepiness. Until recently, there was a lack of long-term prospective randomised controlled trials (RCTs) addressing whether CPAP should be prescribed to non-sleepy …

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