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Randomised controlled trial
CBT stress management reduces recurrent CAD events after myocardial infarction
  1. Peter A Shapiro
  1. Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, USA
  1. Correspondence to Peter A Shapiro
    Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 622 West 168 Street, Box 427, New York, NY 10032, USA; pas3{at}columbia.edu

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Type A behaviour pattern, characterised by anger, impatience, competitiveness and time-urgency, was recognised in the 1970s as an important risk factor for coronary heart disease.1 In 1986, a randomised controlled trial, the Recurrent Coronary Prevention Project, found that group therapy to reduce Type A behaviour led to reduced recurrent coronary events in post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients.2 However, difficulty in standardising measurement of Type A behaviour, changes in …

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