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Cross-sectional study
Non-fasting blood testing for lipid screening in children result in statistically significant, but not clinically significant, changes in lipid levels
  1. Samia Mora
  1. Divisions of Preventive and Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  1. Correspondence to Samia Mora
    Divisions of Preventive and Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 900 Commonwealth Avenue East, third floor, Boston, MA 02215, USA; smora{at}partners.org

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Lipids are typically measured after an 8–12 h fast. Most patients are not fasting when they are initially evaluated by their providers, meaning that a repeat visit is necessary if a fasting blood draw is required. However, if postprandial effects do not substantially alter lipid levels, then a non-fasting blood draw has many practical advantages for clinical practice, particularly in paediatrics where fasting is a challenge. Recent studies in adults have suggested that non-fasting lipids may suffice for initial screening of cardiovascular risk,1,,5 but data in children are scarce. Therefore, the investigators conducted a large cross-sectional study in children to assess differences in lipid values based …

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