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Cohort study
Gender-based violence, perinatal mental health in women and child development
  1. Jane Fisher
  1. Jean Hailes Research Unit, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Jane Fisher
    Jean Hailes Research Unit, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, 43–51 Kanooka Grove, Clayton, Melbourne, Victoria, 3168 Australia; jane.fisher{at}monash.edu

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Context

Interpersonal violence is regarded as a global public health problem by the WHO,1 whose definition includes that it is intentional, a misuse of power and results in psychological harm. The United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women2 defines any act of violence against women in their families, the general community or that perpetrated by the state as gender-based violence. It acknowledges that women are more vulnerable than men to all forms of violence, which is a very well-established risk factor for depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and suicidal behaviours.3

Recent evidence about the effect of antenatal anxiety in women on the development …

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