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Randomised controlled trial
Topical dexamethasone for recurrent aphthous ulceration reduces pain and size and increases healing with no significant adverse events
  1. Crispian Scully,
  2. Rachel Cowie
  1. WHO Collaborating Centre for Oral Health-General Health, Bristol Dental Hospital, Bristol, UK
  1. Correspondence to Rachel Cowie
    WHO Collaborating Centre for Oral Health-General Health, Bristol Dental Hospital, Lower Maudlin St, Bristol, Avon BS1 2LY, UK; Rachel.Cowie{at}UHBristol.nhs.uk

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Recurrent aphthous ulceration or stomatitis (RAS) is a common condition characterised by painful recurring oral ulcers, typically commencing in childhood. These ulcers classically present as round or oval lesions, and have a yellow or grey base and a surrounding erythematous inflammatory halo. Although ‘aphthous-like ulcers’ can be associated with a number of systemic diseases, ‘recurrent aphthous ulceration’ is a term that should strictly be reserved for recurring ulcers arising in the absence of associated systemic disease.1 The lifetime prevalence of RAS has been estimated at 36.5%2 and approximately 80% of all are recurring minor type aphthae,1 rather than major or herpetiform type, the other described aphthous …

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