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Systematic review and meta-analysis
Antibiotics provide no clinically important benefit in mild to moderate acute sinusitis
  1. Roderick P Venekamp
  1. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
  1. Correspondence to: Roderick P Venekamp
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, STR. 6.131, PO Box 85500, Utrecht 3508 GA, The Netherlands; R.P.Venekamp{at}umcutrecht.nl

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Context

Acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) is a common reason for patients to visit a general practitioner (GP).1 ,2 In general practice, diagnosing ARS is based on clinical signs and symptoms such as nasal congestion, reduction/loss of smell and facial pain/pressure. Although self-limiting in the majority of patients within 1–4 weeks, symptoms consistent with ARS can considerably impair daily functioning.3

Traditionally, ARS has been regarded as a bacterial infection of the paranasal sinuses. Therefore, numerous randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have been performed comparing antibiotic treatment with placebo for mild–moderate ARS. The present study provides …

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