Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Randomised controlled trial
Weight loss and improved fitness slow down the decline in mobility in obese adults with type 2 diabetes
  1. Krupa Shah1,
  2. Dennis T Villareal2
  1. 1Department of Geriatrics and Aging, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA
  2. 2Section of Geriatrics, New Mexico Veterans Affairs Health Care System and Division of Geriatrics, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
  1. Correspondence to: Dr Dennis T Villareal
    Section of Geriatrics, New Mexico Veterans Affairs Health Care System and Division of Geriatrics, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM 87108, USA; Dennis.Villareal{at}va.gov

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Commentary on: OpenUrlCrossRefPubMedWeb of Science

Context

The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and its complications challenge our healthcare delivery systems. Indeed, the healthcare industry is vulnerable to the rising costs and faces challenges with respect to increased life expectancy and prevalence of chronic diseases. Adults with T2D often have limitations in mobility and experience increased risk of physical disability.1 Furthermore, the number of obese older adults with T2D has substantially increased in the last 20 years.2 Obesity among older adults is problematic because it not only increases the risk of medical complications but also causes physical dysfunction.3 Functional …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.