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Randomised clinical trial
Brief, patient-centred risk-reduction counselling at the time of a rapid HIV test does not affect subsequent acquisition of sexually transmitted infections
  1. Caitlin E Kennedy
  1. Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  1. Correspondence to: Dr Caitlin E Kennedy, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street E5033, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; ckennedy{at}jhsph.edu

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Context

HIV testing and counselling (HTC) is a key entry point to care and treatment services for those who test HIV positive, and to prevention services for those who test HIV negative. Over the past few decades, HTC has been scaled up globally through client-initiated and provider-initiated testing services. The WHO recommends counselling as an integral part of all HIV testing strategies: ‘Testing services must be accompanied by appropriate and high-quality pretest information or pretest counselling and post-test counselling’.1 However, the nature and extent of pretest counselling in particular has been debated, as extensive counselling requirements may pose human resource …

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