Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Observational study
Failure to fill a first prescription of a new medication is common in primary care settings
  1. Catherine S Hwang1,2,
  2. G Caleb Alexander1,3,4
  1. 1Center for Drug Safety and Effectiveness, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA;
  2. 2Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA;
  3. 3Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA;
  4. 4Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  1. Correspondence to: Dr G Caleb Alexander, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, W6035 Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; galexan9{at}jhu.edu

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Commentary on: Tamblyn R, Eguale T, Huang A, et al. The incidence and determinants of primary non-adherence with prescribed medication in primary care: a cohort study. Ann Intern Med 2014;160:441–50.

Context

Poor medication adherence is common and has been a long-standing concern of providers, payers and policy-makers alike. The incidence and prevalence of primary non-adherence, or the failure to fill a first prescription of a new medication, is increasingly quantifiable with advances in health information technology. Prior work suggests that as many as one-third of new prescriptions may not be filled, although rates of primary non-adherence vary based on a number of factors, including study populations and research designs, as well as medication class, route of administration and formulary status.1–3 Tamblyn and colleagues quantify the …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.