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Low back pain has a poor prognosis for recovery among seniors
  1. Wolf E Mehling
  1. Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA
  1. Correspondence to: Dr Wolf E Mehling, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of California San Francisco, 1545 Divisadero Street, 4th floor, San Francisco, CA 94907, USA; Wolf.Mehling{at}ucsf.edu

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Little is known about the prognosis of low back pain (LBP) in the elderly. In 2006, two epidemiological studies from Italy and Israel reported alarming prevalence rates between 31.5% and 58%. Only one of these was a study with longitudinal data: among 277 surveyed seniors the prevalence of chronic back pain increased from 44% at 70 years old to 58% at 77 years old.1 Larger prognostic studies in the elderly are needed. This study by Rundell and colleagues is a large longitudinal study and a major step in addressing this …

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