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Pertussis has low prevalence in adults with acute cough and is difficult to distinguish clinically from other causes
  1. Abigail Moore,
  2. Helen F Ashdown,
  3. Anthony Harnden
  1. Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
  1. Correspondence to : Professor Anthony Harnden, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX2 6GG, UK; anthony.harnden{at}phc.ox.ac.uk

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Pertussis (whooping cough) is an important cause of persistent cough, even in fully vaccinated individuals, where risk of pertussis increases with time since vaccination.1 ,2 In adults, symptoms may be milder and without the classical paroxysms, whoop and vomiting traditionally associated with pertussis, but nonetheless can be associated with considerable morbidity.1 Several previous studies have investigated incidence and clinical characteristics of pertussis in adults with persistent cough, including a recent study in New Zealand (2 weeks cough duration or greater, n=156 adults) in which 7% adults had laboratory-confirmed pertussis.3 The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence and clinical features of pertussis in adults presenting …

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