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Limited data suggest that otherwise healthy school-aged children with obstructive sleep disordered breathing have some benefit from adenotonsillectomy compared with non-surgical treatment
  1. Susan L Garetz
  1. Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
  1. Correspondence to : Susan L Garetz, MD, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Health System, CW 5-702, 1540 E Hospital Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-4241, USA; Garetz{at}med.umich.edu

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Obstructive sleep disordered breathing (SDB) ranges from simple snoring to obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). In the paediatric population, reported incidence ranges from 1% to 11% worldwide.1 Untreated disease has been associated with cardiovascular and neurocognitive morbidity.2 ,3 Surgical removal of the tonsils and adenoids is widely endorsed as the first-line treatment for otherwise healthy children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy.4 ,5 Non-surgical treatment options include observation, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), medical therapy and orthodontic procedures or devices.6 As with any surgical procedure, risk of complications mandates careful consideration …

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