Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Randomised controlled trial
Adjunctive use of intrapartum foetal ST-segment analysis (STAN) confers no benefit over conventional foetal heart rate monitoring
  1. Alexandros Lazaridis1,
  2. Christoph C Lees2,3
  1. 1Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Du Cane Road, London, UK
  2. 2Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK
  3. 3Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospitals, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London and Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven, Belgium
  1. Correspondence to : Dr Christoph C Lees , Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London SW7; Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospitals, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London and Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven, Belgium; christoph.lees{at}imperial.nhs.uk

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Commentary on: OpenUrlCrossRefPubMed.

Context

Ever since the early 1960s foetal cardiotocography (CTG) has been widely utilised across the globe as a means of intrapartum foetal well-being surveillance. A Cochrane Collaboration review has shown that utilisation of intrapartum CTG reduces incidence of newborn seizures. This in itself is an important outcome as most seizures were hypoxic ischemic and as such had a guarded long-term outcome.1 CTG has not shown clear benefit in reducing cerebral palsy, perinatal death or other labour complications.2 Moreover it has been speculated that CTG use has increased instrumental delivery and Caesarean section rates, due to the high false positive rate and poor positive predictive value of CTG for intrapartum hypoxia.3 In an attempt to reduce unnecessary over-intervention, the concept …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.