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Do not throw the baby out with the bath water: a guide for using non-significant results in practice
  1. Mouaffaa Tello1,
  2. Feras Zaiem1,
  3. Mary Catherine Tolcher1,2,
  4. Mohammad Hassan Murad1
  1. 1Evidence-based Practice Center, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
  2. 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA
  1. Correspondence to : Dr Mohammad Hassan Murad,
    Evidence-based Practice Center, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA; murad.mohammad{at}mayo.edu Précis
    Statistically non-significant results can sometimes be clinically useful and help in decision-making.

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Acting on results that are not statistically significant is challenging for clinicians. Such results are often interpreted as evidence of lack of association or as useless evidence. We provide a framework for interpreting and applying non-significant results at the point of care using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach.

  • OBSTETRICS
  • EDUCATION & TRAINING (see Medical Education & Training)
  • EPIDEMIOLOGY

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Extract

Acting on results that are not statistically significant is challenging for clinicians. Such results are often interpreted as evidence of lack of association or as useless evidence. We provide a framework for interpreting and applying non-significant results at the point of care using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach.

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