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Systematic review with meta-analysis
Lack of a significant relationship between energy intake in pregnancy and gestational weight gain underlines the need for further evaluations of energy metabolism during this time
  1. Rhonda Bell,
  2. Paula Robson
  1. Department of Agricultural, Food & Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  1. Correspondence to: Rhonda Bell, Department of Agricultural, Food & Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2R3; rhonda.bell{at}ualberta.ca

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Context

Recent updates to gestational weight gain (GWG) guidelines recommend women gain weight within a specific range, based on pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), to support the best pregnancy outcomes. While many women exceed the GWG guidelines, the extent to which this reflects inappropriate increases in energy intake is unclear. This study set out to determine whether a greater increment in reported energy intake between early and late pregnancy was associated with greater or excessive GWG.

Methods

The authors conducted a systematic review of studies of women with a full-term singleton pregnancy that included measurement …

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