eLetters

52 e-Letters

  • Opinion editorials: necessity of present times
    Pankaj Jorwal

    Dear Editor,

    This article brings into light the upcoming ways in which medical health care knowledge is disseminated between general population and the various pitfalls such an approach can have. Although such issues are in nascent stage in a developing country like India but its climbing up the ladder at a brisk rate. The new generation of physicians is media savvy but can get easily influenced by media based...

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  • Author's response
    Kit Byatt

    Dear Editor,

    I am very grateful to Ken Uchino for amplifying and clarifying the detail of some of the points I was trying to make within the word limits of a 'Perspectives' paper. I suggest there are four key elements:

    1. The epidemiology is indeed complex and I am neither an academic nor an epidemiologist. However, it would appear that we can agree that there is indeed a difference between 'younger old'...

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  • Overreacting to possible over-treatment? Hypertension treatment in the very elderly.
    Ken Uchino

    Dear Editor,

    While I agree with Dr Byatt that it is important to discuss with patients the choices of treating risk factors to prevent disease, the basis for the discussion needs to be clarified and fine-tuned.

    Epidemiology: The attributable risk of hypertension in stroke decreases in the elderly. This phenomenon may be partly because other factors such as atrial fibrillation become more dominant factor....

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  • Comment on "Need for standardising adverse event reporting in testosterone trials" by Basaria
    C. Mary Schooling

    Dear Editor,

    We are very grateful for the positive comments from Dr Basaria about our meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) showing that testosterone therapy among men increases the risk of a cardiovascular -related event (1;2). As per the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines (item 25) (3), we also highlighted the limitations of our review. We are surpr...

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  • Potential aetiological significance of statin's raising glucose
    C Mary Schooling

    Dear Editor,

    Montori and Brito draw attention to the limited clinical significance of statins' raising glucose (1), consistent with the non-linear association of fasting glucose with cardiovascular disease (2). It is quite possible that the limited clinical significance of statins' minor effects on glucose also translates into limited aetiological significance. On the other hand, statins are not alone in having diver...

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  • Reply to DeFrank and Brewer
    John Brodersen

    Dear Editor,

    We would like to thank DeFrank and Brewer for their interest in our recently published paper: Long-Term Psychosocial Consequences of False- Positive Screening Mammography.(1)

    In the Methods section DeFrank and Brewer write: "Brodersen and colleagues conducted a study of 454 adult women in Denmark screened in the same time period who had normal mammography screening results, false- positives or...

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  • Are Children at Unnecessary Risk of Medication Incidents?
    John C Furness

    Dear Editor,

    Medication incidents are the commonest reported clinical incident in children and the second most common in neonates. [1] Current evidence is that the most effective method of reducing these incidents in the acute hospital is to have frequent attendance on the ward by a clinical pharmacist. [2,3] This was discussed by Chua in Evidence Based Medicine.[4]

    We wanted to see how many other units i...

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  • Authors' Response: Postpartum bleeding is reduced with sublingual powdered misoprostol when compared with oxytocin injection, but a new formulation of misoprostol is unlikely to revolutionise postpartum haemorrhage care
    Mrutyunjaya B. Bellad

    Dear Editor,

    We thank Beverly Winikoff and Jill Durocher for their thoughtful commentary.(1) Winikoff and Durocher note that the incidence of PPH in our study's (2) oxytocin group was higher than expected. This deviance can occur, particularly in studies with relatively small samples such as ours. Regardless, the randomization produced study groups with similar characteristics to each other,(2) although this par...

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  • It is unethical to give placebo
    Neeru Gupta

    Dear Editor, The trial has two arms: magsulf and placebo. In my opinion the subjects should give informed consent and instead of blinding the treatment, the subjects should be able to opt for which arm they would like to participate. And lastly, instead of placebo some other treatment like diazepam or phenytoin should have been given as denying treatment is unethical. Moreover, the magsulf has severe side effects e.g. res...

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  • How should we measure psychological consequences of false-positive screening mammograms adequately?
    John Brodersen

    Dear Editor,

    In this week's EBM, Bond and colleagues report a systematic review entitled: 'Psychological consequences of false-positive screening mammograms in the UK'.(1) Their two main outcomes are self-reported questionnaires, and attendance at the next screening round.

    Together with two colleagues, I conducted a systematic review in 2004 on the adequacy of measurement of short and long-term consequence...

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