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Cross-over randomised controlled trial
Long-acting β-agonist step-up therapy is more likely to provide best response, compared to inhaled corticosteroid or leukotriene-receptor antagonist step-up in children with uncontrolled asthma receiving inhaled corticosteroids
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  • Published on:
    Re:Conflicts of interest
    • Kazuya Yamazaki, Graduate School of Political Science
    • Other Contributors:
      • Yoshitaka Tsubono

    Disclosure of conflicts of interest in Japanese randomized controlled trials

    Dear Editor,

    Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest (COI) is essential in interpreting randomized controlled trials with less risk of bias. In 2008, the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare issued an ethical guideline for clinical research that endorsed disclosure of potential COI 1. To assess impact of the gu...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Editor's reply to "Conflicts of Interest"

    I agree with Dr. Tomedi's assertion that one might question the credibility of a commentary written by someone who has received pharmaceutical industry support, or for a number of other reasons. It is for this reason that BMJ Group policies ask authors to acknowledge and openly state any competing interests (1), and as a result of this policy, Dr. Tomedi could become aware of them and consider them in reading the commenta...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Conflicts of interest

    Dear editor,

    The important influence of pharmaceutical manufacturers on the medical literature, and the positive "spin" placed on results and conclusions, has been well documented. Given this pervasive problem, readers may question the credibility of the commentary of an EBM reviewer who has "received consulting fees from MSD, Schering, Novartis and GSK and received honoraria from Altana, Astra Zeneca, Boehringer Inglehi...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.