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Harms of CT scanning prior to surgery for suspected appendicitis
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  • Published on:
    Re:Inaccurate radiation exposure calculation

    Dear Editor,

    You are correct that protocols and improved technology have led to reductions in radiation exposure from CT scanning at some hospitals. I would suggest though that the resultant reduction in the risk of fatal cancer due to imaging does not affect the conclsion of the paper. If a laparotomy on a healthy young patient carries no risk of death and CT scanning imposes a risk of death the decision to perfor...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Inaccurate radiation exposure calculation

    Dear Editor,

    Dr Rogers et al have astutely pointed out the dangers of routine CT assessment of right iliac fossa pain in the paediatric population. I agree wholeheartedly that the role of clinical judgement, alongside observation and serial examination remain critical. Ultrasonography and MRI are additional valuable diagnostic adjuncts that do not incur a radiation dose to patients.

    I would question the da...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re:Further research in low dose CT scan for suspected appendicitis.

    We share your enthusiasm for the current efforts to reduce radiation exposure associated with the use of CT scanning and agree with your assertion that performance of appendectomy without scanning will inevitably lead to more negative appendectomies. We are confident though based on the NHS laparoscopic appendectomy statistics reviewed by Omar and Clark in the Annals of Surgery that those negative appendectomies are asso...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Further research in low dose CT scan for suspected appendicitis.

    Dear Editor,

    We read with great interest the recent article written by William Rogers et al on the Harms of CT scanning prior to surgery for suspected appendicitis(1). It highlights the radiation risk of cancer while routinely performing an abdominal CT scan on an otherwise healthy patient with symptoms suggestive of appendicitis. This radiation risk of cancer becomes all the more important in patients with 'ne...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.