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094 How to use proms for shared decision-making: a conceptual framework
  1. Anouk Groenewegen1,
  2. Maud MVan Muilekom1,
  3. Marij A Hillen2,
  4. Ellen MA Smets2,
  5. Dirk T Ubbink3,
  6. Glyn Elwyn4,
  7. Hedy AVan Oers1,
  8. Trudy Van Der Weijden5,
  9. Anna JHM Beurskens5,
  10. Lotte Haverman1,6,
  11. Olga C Damman7
  1. 1Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychosocial Care, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Emma Children’s Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  2. 2Department of Medical Psychology, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  3. 3Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  4. 4Coproduction Laboratory, Dartmouth Institute of Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Hanover, the USA
  5. 5Department of Family Medicine, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
  6. 6Department of Strategy and Policy, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  7. 7Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Abstract

Introduction Patient-reported outcomes, -preferences and values are important factors in offering Patient-Centered Care (PCC) and Value-Based Health Care (VBHC). These factors, however, are often not discussed during clinical encounters.1–5 Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) and Shared Decision-Making (SDM) are promising tools to incorporate these factors within the clinical encounter. PROMs can offer insight in outcomes that are important to patients, and SDM can set a scene for discussing the topics. However, clinicians and researchers have not yet widely recognized the integrated application of PROMs and SDM for delivering PCC and VBHC. Therefore, we aimed to develop a conceptual framework illustrating the synergy between PROMs and SDM, demonstrating their collaborative utilization.

Methods In spring 2023, experts specialized in PROMs and SDM in the Netherlands, initiated the development of the framework. The four-step SDM model6 was used as a basis, to incorporate PROMs in the SDM process. A mixed-method design was used, consisting of the following steps:

Identifying existing initiatives and tools on the integrated application of PROMs and SDM in the literature.

Gathering expert (N=13) opinions on the integrated application of PROMs and SDM during open discussions.

Gathering researchers and healthcare workers (N±100) opinions on the integrated application of PROMs and SDM via interactive sessions during a symposium and webinar.

Designing the conceptual framework by integrating input from step 1–3.

Result Results from step 1–3 indicated that PROMs particularly fit in the phase of agenda/goal setting, and the SDM-phases option-talk and choice-talk. The final framework will be presented at the conference.

Discussion and Conclusion A conceptual framework was designed to illustrate the synergy between PROMs and SDM as a starting point for clinical practice, and to stimulate international collaboration between both (research) fields.

References

  1. Savelberg W, Smidt M, Boersma LJ, van der Weijden T. BMC Health Serv Res. 2020;20(1):1–10.

  2. Teela L, van Muilekom M, van Oers H. Qual. Life Res. 2021;30:3267–3277.

  3. Rake EA, Box ICH, Elwyn G. Patient Educ Couns. 2022;105(9):2860–2870.

  4. Joseph-Williams N, Lloyd A, Thomson R. BMJ. 2017;357.

  5. Nguyen H, Butow P, Dhillon H, Sandaresan P. JMRS. 2021;68(2):186–195.

  6. Stiggelbout AM, Pieterse AH, De Haes JCJM. Patient Educ Couns. 2015;98(10):1172–1179.

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