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Primary care
Challenges in interpreting results from ‘multiple regression’ when there is interaction between covariates
  1. Ian Shrier1,2,
  2. Annabelle Redelmeier3,
  3. Mireille E Schnitzer4,
  4. Russell J Steele3
  1. 1 Epidemiology, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Montreal, Québec, Canada
  2. 2 Lady Davis Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada
  3. 3 Mathematics and Statistics, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada
  4. 4 Faculté de Pharmacie et École de Santé Publique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Québec, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Dr Ian Shrier, Epidemiology, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Montreal, QC H3T 1E2, Canada; ian.shrier{at}mcgill.ca

Footnotes

  • Contributors Each of the authors contributed to the development of ideas and the writing of this paper. IS is the guarantor of the article. He is a primary care physician and epidemiologist working in the fields of evidence synthesis, injury epidemiology and causal inference. AR was a Masters student when the project began and has since graduated. She was instrumental in developing and editing the early drafts of the manuscript. MES and RJS are statisticians with expertise in causal inference and were essential in ensuring that the technical details of the manuscript were correct and that the English correctly conveyed the mathematical analyses.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors Each of the authors contributed to the development of ideas and the writing of this paper. IS is the guarantor of the article. He is a primary care physician and epidemiologist working in the fields of evidence synthesis, injury epidemiology and causal inference. AR was a Masters student when the project began and has since graduated. She was instrumental in developing and editing the early drafts of the manuscript. MES and RJS are statisticians with expertise in causal inference and were essential in ensuring that the technical details of the manuscript were correct and that the English correctly conveyed the mathematical analyses.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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